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Camel Meat and Cassette Tapes Part II

Illustration by Maya (Mihindou) Tarnowski

Previously, we worked with elders in the Somali community and explored the stories they handed down, myths, the story of Queen Araweelo, anti-colonial songs and camel-herding. 


In response to the previous project, we worked with young Somali people and explored their relationships with cassettes, community and understanding of the self as it relates to the diaspora. 


For the project worked with archivists and founders of WaaberiPhone, Ibrahim Hirsi and Idel Elmi to explore alternative archives and the ways we can remember. And with sound artist Rowan Bishop to play around with making experimental sounds, like making tape loops.


 A soundscape was produced and will be distributed in the form of limited edition cassette tapes in the near future. 

A special thank you to our co-producers Abir Jama, Aaliyah Ismail, Rabia Mohamed, Khadija Mohamed, Fadumo Ismail, Abdillahi Ali and Abdulahi Jama.


We’d also like to thank our funders, Arts Council England for funding this project and thank you to the Pervasive Media Studio, Ben Thomas and British Empire and Commonwealth archive. 

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Camel Meat and Cassette Tapes Part I

Illustration by Stacey Olika

Camel meat and Tapes, is a research project that focuses on the rich oral history of Somali people. A history that has come to transcend borders through the form of cassette tapes from the early 80’s and onwards – almost all somali families that you may encounter can recount numerous stories and emotions that are tied into the materiality of a cassette. These tapes became a valuable vessel for the diaspora allowing them to communicate with families they were forced to leave behind – the stories ranged from the mundane activities of everyday life to milestones achieved on a national scale to even encompass divorces or love affairs. 

A special thank you to our co-producers Fadumo, Suad, Samiye, Anab, Qasmina and Amina.


We’d also like to thank our funders, the Paul Hamlyn Foundation for funding this project as part of City Fellows and thank you to the Arnolfini, Khalil Aden, Muna Mohammed (Primeway care team), Letty Clarke, Ben Thomas, Stacey Olika, Abbi Bayliss, Xavier Velastín, Sue and Jane from the Bristol Archives, and Jo Kimber. 

 

Snippet from the first soundscape: